Review of Cat Quest

catquest

Once again I played a video game were the objective is to save a damsel in distress. Thankfully what Cat Quest lacks in originality it makes up for in funny feline puns and awesome gameplay. Developed by Singapore outfit Gentlebros, Cat Quest is another example of a title making the successful leap from mobile devices to console. Players assume the role of a silent paw-tagonist who travels across an isle, inhabited by humanoid kitties, in search of his abducted sister. Over the course of this eight-hour adventure our hero will have to vanquish an evil knight named Drakoth and a trio of dragons who are terrorizing the land.

OVERVIEW

Drakoth has kidnapped an innocent girl. What a cat-astrophe! Oh well, fear not because the captured maiden has a sibling who won’t rest until his sis is saved. Playing through Cat Quest reminded me of classic Zelda. There aren’t any puzzles to test your brainpower, as a handy marker tells you exactly what to do, but the combat is pure 2D hack n slash. Another similarity the two titles share is that the game features a mute playable character, who is accompanied by a diminutive flying sidekick. Thankfully the fairy in Cat Quest is less annoying than Navi, although you may think otherwise if you dislike characters that spew out puns.

The combat in Cat Quest is fun, but far from purr-fect. Due to a lack of depth the battles get repetitive after a while, so I would recommend playing the game in short bursts. In most cases you’ll deal with foes by evading their initial attack, with a well-timed roll, which you can then follow up with a barrage of sword swipes. A handy red radius indicates exactly where and when an enemy is going to strike. Complimenting the physical damage you inflict are magic spells that can restore health, boost strength and burn anyone in the vicinity. Sorcery costs mana to activate, which you can easily replenish by landing melee hits.

VERDICT

My rating for Cat Quest is a three out of five. The game missed out on four stars by a “whisker.” Although the humour and cute graphics are nice I can’t award it a higher score due to the lack of variety. Both the main campaign and optional missions, which you procure from village bulletin boards, are nothing more than glorified fetch quests. Cat Quest also suffers from a lack of challenge. The hit and run strategy I outlined above works on everyone, be they lowly rodents or mighty bosses. Should you mess up and die it’s no big deal either. The only penalty for death is that you re-spawn at a nearby town.

On the plus side I liked how the loot you procure, from adventuring, can be used to customize the main character. Every piece of gear has its own modifiers that influence health, damage and defence. The way you go about purchasing new equipment feels like opening a loot box. Gold you earn can be spent at the smithy to open chests, which award random gear. Obtaining a duplicate is no biggie, because if you pick up a repeat said weapon/accessory will level up in power. Sweet! Okay, that’s enough typing for today. Thank you for reading the review. Until next time, I am meowt of here!